I figured that presenting a table of contents for the book would make it easier to get an idea of the contents or direction of the book. As you see, the book may have wider implications/applications than simply becoming financially independent and retiring early. The focus is on achieving extreme economic efficiencies through systems theory and thus it should also be useful for general management of operations such as businesses, organizations, clubs, etc. particularly as it relates to the design of such things.


  • About the book
  • A different frame of mind
    • Is this for me?
    • Barriers to change
  • The lock-in
    • Education and training
      • College degrees
    • Career
      • Specialization
      • The cost of specialization
      • Job competition
    • The pursuit of stuff, status, and happiness
    • The problem with personal finance
      • Mortgage, car-loans, and consumer debt
      • Savings and investments
    • Retirement
    • Breaking out
  • Economic degrees of freedom
    • Economic classifications
      • The salary man
      • The working man
      • The businessman
      • The Renaissance man
    • Succession and the cycle of change
      • Ergodicity and destiny
        • Agency
    • Our current world
      • Leaving the Dark Ages
    • The next generation
  • The Renaissance ideal
    • Human capital and necessary personal assets
      • Physiological
      • Intellectual
      • Economic
      • Emotional
      • Social
      • Technical
      • Ecological
    • The Renaissance education
    • Gauging mastery
    • Decoupling and increasing complexity
  • Strategy, tactics, and guiding principles
    • Strategic principles
      • A modular design
        • Using the modules correctly
      • Contingency goal-setting
        • Effect-mapping
        • A web of goals
        • Tensegrity
    • Tactical principles
      • Identifying needs and wants
      • Building blocks
      • Construction methods
      • Appropriate response
        • Sigmoids, logistic curves, and the maximum power principle
  • A Renaissance lifestyle
    • Things
      • Which things should I own?
        • Depreciation schedules
        • All the little luxuries
        • Mono-use and Multi-use
        • Being the master of your stuff
      • How to avoid getting things
      • How to get rid of things
        • Giving away
        • Selling
        • Serial ownership
        • Bartering and swapping
        • Using up and wearing out
      • How to get things
        • Free things
        • Swapping and bartering
        • Renting
        • Borrowing
        • Sharing ownership
        • Living behind the cutting edge
        • The “limit order” price book
      • How to make things
        • Reusing
        • The fixer-upper or “holding”
    • Shelter
      • Sleeping and other living arrangements
        • Living
        • Eating
        • Hygiene
        • Living with other people
        • Rent or own?
      • How to find shelter
      • Telecommuting and work
      • Domestic food supply
      • Lights and electric
      • Heating and cooling
    • Clothes
      • Fixing up a wardrobe
        • How to build a wardrobe
        • Making your own clothing
      • Laundry
    • Health
      • Moving
        • The couch potato
        • The runner
        • The bodybuilder
        • Functional fitness
        • High-intensity interval training
        • Intensity levels
        • Measuring progress
      • Eating
        • A comfortable addiction
        • Eating like a farmer
        • Eating like an athlete
        • Eating like a warrior
        • Eating every other day, even?
        • Eating out
        • Cooking
        • Optimizing ingredients
        • Optimizing utensils
        • Detergents, cleaners, and other household stuff
    • Transportation
        • Comparing modes of transportation
      • Driving
        • Affordable driving
      • Walking
        • Running as transportation
      • Cycling
    • Services
      • TV, cell phones, and other money sinks
        • Cell phones
        • Internet
        • TV
      • Money, credit, and insurance
        • Credit cards
        • Insurance
    • People
      • Spouses and significant others
      • Children
  • Foundations of economics and finance
        • Personal economics
    • Financial cash flow cycles
    • Working for money
      • Salaried work
      • Nonsalaried work
    • Making money work for you
      • Important financial ratios
        • Emergency funds
        • Savings rate for financial independence
        • Intermittent work
      • Financial independence and investing
      • Investing and reasonable return rates
        • The true cost of things
        • So what should I invest in?
      • Asset management
        • Investment science
  • Epilogue
  • References

I put in a link to the references which I already published previously. If you have a year of spare time, I’d recommend going through that list and reading them one by one. They’ll provide the raw material for the thoughts that the book is composed of.


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